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Wall Insulation

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Homes in the UK are some of the most inefficient in Europe, with the majority of heat lost through the walls of the building. Insulating your walls, floors and roof will help the heat generated to stay in your home. There are several insulation options available depending on how a property is constructed.

 

Generally, there are two types of wall construction; modern houses, i.e. built post 1945, will normally have cavity walls (a gap between the outer and inner wall) and older style homes are usually built with solid walls. A third of heat is lost through cavity walls but solid walls tend to lose even more. Insulating solid walls can be expensive, however, the savings that can be made by installing internal or external wall insulation are substantial.
 

There are many ways to insulate your home, and below are some of the more common measures in more detail.
 

Solid Wall Insulation:

Solid wall insulation adds a layer of material to the exterior or interior walls of a house to keep it better insulated.

This insulation helps retain heat and keep cold air out, making your home warmer and more energy efficient. Solid wall insulation is especially beneficial for older homes that may not have cavity walls.
 

Cavity Wall Insulation:

Cavity wall insulation is a way to fill the gap or cavity between your home's inner and outer walls with insulating material.


Insulation helps to prevent heat loss and can make your home more energy efficient. Cavity wall insulation is a popular and cost-effective way to improve the energy performance of your home.

Loft Insulation:

You can add insulating material to the space between your ceiling and roof to prevent heat from escaping through the roof. Loft insulation is one of the most effective ways to keep your house warm, save energy and reduce heating costs.

Underfloor Insulation:

Underfloor insulation involves adding insulating material beneath the floorboards to prevent heat from escaping through the floor. This type of insulation can warm your home, reduce drafts, and save energy. Underfloor insulation is beneficial in older homes with suspended floors or in homes with cold ground floors.

Room-in-roof Insulation:

Room-in-roof insulation is a way to insulate the ceilings and walls of rooms directly under the roof. This insulation helps retain heat and prevent energy loss through the roof. Room-in-roof insulation can make your home more comfortable and reduce heating costs in rooms that tend to get colder.

  • Will my air source heat pump make a lot of noise?
    A common concern is that the pump will make a lot of noise when running. The level of noise depends on how hard it needs to work, its make, its size and installation. Manufacturers are always working on reducing noise levels. They typically range between 40-60 decibels, which is similar to a refrigerator. The pump will be most active during the colder months, but that’s when people tend to not spend as much time outside so it shouldn’t be noticeable when inside.
  • Will my heat pump stop working when it’s cold?
    No. Air source heat pumps can work effectively in as low as -25°C, being commonly used in countries considerably colder than the UK, such as Norway. The pump will work harder when it’s cold, which is the same as most heating systems, but they will continue to be at least twice as efficient as a gas boiler.
  • Should I turn my pump off when I don’t want heat and on when I do want heat?
    For most kinds of heating, it is common practice to run it for a short amount of time. With an air source heat pump, this is not the case. Turning the air pump on and off will not help the pump to run efficiently. It’s more efficient to allow plenty of time for the pump to reach the temperature you want and leave it running. For example, do this by: Decide your comfortable temperature. In this case, let's say 21°C. Decide when you want your home to be warm, for example when you wake up at 7am. Whatever time you decide, minus 3 hours, and this is the time you will program the heating to come on. In this case at 4am. The same applies in reverse for the evening when you don’t need the heating to be so high. Comfortable overnight temperature may be 16°C. You go to bed at 11pm. Set your heating to 16°C at 8pm. Doing this allows your heat pump to work efficiently and you gain maximum benefit from it, whilst keeping the cost of running it down.
  • How do I maintain my heat pump?
    As with gas boilers, your heat pump will need to be serviced annually to maintain the warranty and ensure it continues to run efficiently. Heat pumps generally cost less to maintain compared to gas boilers. It is worth speaking to your energy provider to see if they have a service plan.
  • Who do I contact if I come across any issues with my new system?
    If you find any issues with your new system, your first point of call will be to speak with the installers who fitted your system. They will be able to guide you through any issues you may be experiencing. Some installers have support blogs on their website which can offer troubleshooting advice, so it is always worth exploring your installers webpage.
  • Who do I contact if I come across any issues with my new system?
    If you find any issues with your new system, your first point of call will be to speak with the installers who fitted your system. They will be able to guide you through any issues you may be experiencing.
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